NYSCAS: New York School of Career and Applied Studies

Education

The Department of Education offers concentrations in Early Childhood (birth-grade 2) and Childhood (grades 1-6) teaching preparation within the Psychology major. This program is registered with the New York State Education Department and also meets New York City requirements for early childhood and elementary school teachers.

FACULTY
A. Polemeni, Dean of Education and Psychology; Y. Karpov, Associate Dean; R. Lehrer, Chair, Graduate Studies in General and Special Education; A. Brezak, Chair of Undergraduate Studies; C. Barksdale, Chair (NYSCAS); D. Zelasko, Coordinator of Undergraduate Field Instruction and Student Teaching, N. Aiello, A. Amaez, M. C. Colon, H. Atlas-Cutler, J. Dickstein, B. Epstein, M. Farbstein, S. Grun, R.A. Haber, M. Imas, S. Luel, D. Miller, E. Nikolakakos, J. Norman, M. Press, H. Rabinowitz, A. Skop, N. Soto-Ruiz, D. Steinman.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

GED 201 Psychosocial Foundations of Growth, Development, and Learning, Birth-Grade 6
The nature of physical, cognitive, emotional, social, and moral development from birth through early adolescence, with implications for early intervention, early childhood education, and elementary school classroom teaching; integration of theory and research findings from the fields of developmental psychology and educational psychology. During the second half of the semester students in the early childhood program and students in the childhood program direct their projects and papers to the study of the respective developmental levels of their programs.
3 credits

GED 204 Foundations of American Education (Fall, Spring)
Principles of multicultural education, including history, philosophy and methodology involved in working with diverse populations, will be examined. Social, cultural and ideological forces which have shaped educational policies and institutions in the United States, and their implications for schooling, are addressed.
Prerequisites: GED 201. 3 credits

GED 207 Overview of Special Education (Fall)
The course presents an overview of normal development with emphasis on its relationship to the handicapped. Acquaints regular teaching personnel with the major diagnostic areas of the handicapped and offers techniques of helping the learning disabled child to function in the mainstream of education. This course does not count toward teaching certification.
Prerequisite: GED 201. 3 credits

GED 209 Foundations of Parenting (Fall, Spring)
Parents and families as the context for growth, development and learning; similarities and differences in parenting styles in various cultural groups; the range of family structures; parents and family members as teachers of young children and collaborators with professional educators; ways in which early childhood education programs build and expand upon the foundation provided by parents; how educators form constructive educational partnerships with parents; awareness of community resources for parents and their young children.
Prerequisite: GED 201. 3 credits

GED 233 Learning Activities for Young Children (Fall, Spring)
This course focuses upon the principles and procedures for planning and providing formal and informal learning experiences, which aid young children in developing motor, cognitive, physical and social skills. Special emphasis on creating learning materials. Field work is required. This course does not count toward teaching certification.
Prerequisite: GED 201. 3 credits

GED 301 Teaching Reading and Language Arts, Grades 1 - 6 (Fall)
The developmental context to current approaches to teaching reading; creation of language-rich environments; organization of a functional reading program; informational and critical reading; assessment of reading and language skills; oral and written communication; approaches to work with English language learners and students with special needs; and attention to motivational factors in literacy development at home as well as at school.
Prerequisite: GED 201. 3 credits

GED 302 Diagnosis and Correction of Reading Disabilities (Spring)
The developmental context to understanding the symptoms and causes of reading disabilities; use and interpretation of achievement tests and diagnostic instruments; materials and methods used in remedial instruction; and preparation of teacher-made reading materials. Work with children and writing of case studies are required components of field experience.
Prerequisite: GED 301. 3 credits

GED 303 Teaching the Social Studies Spectrum Subjects, Grades 1 . 6 (Spring)
The social and developmental contexts for teaching social studies spectrum subjects to a diverse elementary school student population; curriculum development and methods and materials; development of integrated instruction in history and geography (including history and geography of the United States and New York State), economics, citizenship and government, and the world of work; appreciation of the diversity of social life, including language, across cultures; approaches to linking instruction to the context of students' lives.
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: GED 201. 3 credits

GED 304 Mathematics, Science, and Technology: Teaching and Remediation, Grades 1 . 6 (Fall)
The developmental context for a problem-solving approach to mathematics, science, and technology instruction and remediation; developmentally appropriate curriculum development and methods of teaching and remediation in mathematics, science, and technology; emphasis on manipulative materials and hands-on activities; application of mathematical concepts and skills in the study of science; application of mathematical concepts and skills and scientific concepts in real-life settings; and appreciation of the benefits, promise, and hazards of technology.
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: GED 201. 3 credits

GED 306 Teaching the Arts and Physical Education, Grades 1 . 6 (Spring)
The cognitive, emotional, and social contexts for exploring various art forms, including performing arts, movement, sports activities and other areas of physical education; discovering and building on individual interests and creative abilities; creating developmentally appropriate opportunities for self-expression and self-exploration; cooperation in group art and sports activities; the relationship of the arts and physical education to other curricula areas.

Prerequisite or Co-requisite: GED 201. 3 credits

GED 307 Diagnosis in Special Education (Spring)
This course prepares the teacher in the basics of specific diagnosis. Emphasis is on understanding tests and measurements as they lead to specific diagnostic categories; reading and understanding psychological, and other relevant education reports. Emphasis placed on helping the child adjust and function in the school environment. Visits to diagnostic centers are included. This course does not count toward teaching certification.
Prerequisite: GED 201. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: GED 207. 3 credits

GED 311 Principles of Early Childhood Education (Spring) (formerly GED 233)
Planning, development, and implementation of learning environments and integrated curricula for young children; study of the relational processes through which children acquire knowledge, skills, and a positive attitude toward learning; the importance of play as well as teacher planning that provides students with opportunities to think about and discuss their work; current research on early childhood integrated experience and instruction in literacy, the arts, science, math, and technology, social studies (including exposure to a range of cultures and languages as well as US and NYS history and geography), family, career and consumer education, and physical education and health.
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: GED 201. 3 credits

GED 312 Methodology of Early Childhood Education (Fall)
Development of practice skills in the use of appropriate, creative methods and materials for integrated education of young children; emphasis on the use of play and hands-on activities as well as planned experience and instruction that provide students with opportunities to explore and manipulate ideas and concepts as they explore and manipulate the world; practical implementation of integrated instruction in the curricula areas noted in the course description for GED 311.
Prerequisite: GED 311. 3 credits

GED 316 Language Acquisition and Emergent Literacy I, Birth - Pre-K (Spring)
The uses of oral language (building vocabulary, expression and comprehension of the spoken word), general cognitive skills (attention, memory, use of symbols, self-regulation), the concepts underlying reading and writing, and specific literacy skills (such as symbol to symbol correspondence) as the context of and initial steps toward literacy for young children. Motivational issues that pertain to the development of reading skills are explored. Emphasis on meeting the needs of young children, including those with limited proficiency in English, who enter day care, nursery school, and other early childhood and early intervention programs with inadequate literacy-related knowledge and skills.
Prerequisite: GED 201. 3 credits

GED 317 Language Acquisition and Emergent Literacy II, K - Grade 2 (Fall)
Creation of language-rich environments and holistic approaches to reading instruction that meet the needs of children with varying language preparation and aptitudes as well as children from diverse backgrounds. Use of a range of teaching and learning modalities. Attention to connections between speech sounds and spellings; the alphabetic principle and recognition of words through letter-sound relations; achieving fluency and comprehension; spelling conventions. Emphasis on language-related experiences at home as well as school and the importance of frequent opportunities to write. Identification of services needed for children who are not making adequate progress in reading, and the importance of coordination of efforts among general educators, special educators, and reading specialists. Discussion of approaches used with language-minority children, including the conditions under which more or less emphasis is placed on reading in the native language.

Prerequisite: GED 201. 3 credits

GED 318 Field Experience and Student Teaching I (Fall, Spring)
Students complete 50 hours of field experience in general education with one of the three following developmental groups: birth-pre-K, and grades 1-2 (combined field experience/student teaching in general education must cover all three developmental levels). Students also complete one 20-day student teaching experience in general education with one of the three developmental groups.
For field experience, students work with appropriately certified cooperating teachers at school sites to gradually assume increased teacher-related responsibilities in the classroom. Field experience includes scheduled meetings, supervised by the Coordinator of Teaching or another assigned faculty member. Logs of hours and activities are maintained by all students, to be reviewed by the Coordinator. Written assignments require careful observation of cooperating teachers and children as well as reflection on the application of course work to the classroom. For student teaching, student teachers are supervised by appropriately certified cooperating teachers. Students are also observed and evaluated by a Touro faculty member. Student teaching placements are made in which students can increasingly take responsibility for teaching activities, including reaching the point of presenting academic lessons and activities independently. Students keep logs of their hours and experiences. Student teaching experiences are accompanied by regularly scheduled classes. Instruction is provided and discussion encouraged on professional issues ranging from creating lesson plans to arranging a professional portfolio and resume. Particular emphasis is placed on self-awareness and analysis of one's own teaching performance.
Prerequisite: completion of all education courses, approval of Education Chair, receipt of a passing grade on the STAT (Student Teaching Admissions Test). 2 credits

GED 380 Computers and Educational Technology in General Education and Special Education (Fall, Spring) (formerly GCO/GED 280)
Introduction to educational use of computers and specialized technologies that facilitate learning, communication and mobility for all students, including those with special needs. Assistive technologies will be explored. Instructional applications of computer hardware and software will be examined. Students will be encouraged to research and adapt new technologies for educational use.
Prerequisites: GCO 122 and GED 201. 3 credits

GED 510 Substance Abuse Seminar (Fall, Spring)
Seminar on the nature of substances of abuse, including legal as well as illegal drugs; factors associated with avoidance of and resistance to use and abuse of substances; risk factors; research on effective school-based substance abuse prevention programs. Current literature on substance abuse and school based prevention programs is distributed.
0 credits

GED 511 Child Abuse Seminar (Fall, Spring)
Seminar on the identification and reporting of child abuse and neglect; signs and symptoms to look for; ways to approach children; understanding the variety of ways children may convey that they are being abused or neglected; the teacher's fear of reporting abuse or neglect; rationalizations for not reporting; working with systems; the aftermath of reporting abuse or neglect.
0 credits

GED 512 Seminar on Child Safety Education, Prevention of Child Abduction, and Fire and Arson Prevention (Fall, Spring)
Basic principles of child safety education; understanding particular safety issues and risk factors for different ages; using developmentally appropriate methods and materials to convey safety principles; proper use of materials and environments with attention to safety hazards, including fire; refusal skill instruction including those related to fire and arson prevention as well as child abduction.
0 credits

GED 513 Seminar on School Violence Prevention and Intervention (Fall, Spring)
Instruction on statutes, regulations and policies relating to a safe, nonviolent school climate; effective classroom management techniques and academic supports that promote a nonviolent school climate and enhance learning; social and problem-solving skill development for students within the regular school curriculum; warning signs within a developmental and social context that relate to violence and other troubling behaviors in children; intervention techniques to address a school violence situation; and how to participate in an effective school/community referral process for students exhibiting violent behavior. A booklet on violence prevention and intervention will be distributed and discussed.
0 credits

EdSE 319 Field Experience, Grades 1-6 (Fall, Spring)
Students complete 100 hours of field experience in special education with one or two of the two groups - grades 1-3 and grades 4-6 - required for total field and student teaching experience in special education. Students also complete 50 hours of field experience in general education with both of the developmental groups.
Students work with appropriately certified cooperating teachers at school sites to gradually assume increased teacher-related responsibilities in the classroom. Field experience includes scheduled meetings, supervised by the Coordinator of Student Teaching or another assigned faculty member. Logs of hours and activities are maintained by all students, to be reviewed by the Coordinator. Written assignments require careful observation of cooperating teachers and children as well as reflection on the application of course work to the classroom
Note: Upper division students can register for this course with the approval of the Chair of the Department.
2 credits

EdSE 600 History and Philosophy of Education and Special Education (Fall, Spring)
Historical and philosophical underpinnings of modern educational theory and practice. Study of: ancient Greek literature; early Jewish, Christian, and Muslim writings; philosophical developments in the Renaissance, Reformation, and revolutionary periods; social, cultural and ideological forces that have shaped educational policies in the United States; current debates on meeting the wide range of educational and social-emotional needs of students from diverse communities.
Prerequisite: Education Department approval, upper division status, admission into the Education Concentration Program (ECP). 3 credits

EdSE 640 Assessment of Individual Differences in General Education and Special Education: A Socio-Cultural Perspective (Fall, Spring)
Assessment in general education and special education of individual differences in intelligence, learning potential, personality, motivation, and school achievement; management of data from assessment and monitoring of student progress; characteristics of standardized tests; the role of educational testing in program design and informing instruction; assessment of young children; use of achievement tests; relationship between assessment and program design; introduction to dynamic (or interactive) assessment; differences between static and dynamic assessment; the use of teacher-made, informal tests; opportunity to observe and practice use of achievement tests, curriculum-based assessment, and curriculum-oriented dynamic assessment approaches in classrooms.
Prerequisite: Education Department approval, upper division status, admission into the Education Concentration Program (ECP). 3 credits

SpEd 309 Principles of Curriculum Development for Students with Disabilities, Grades 1-6 (Fall)
Review of curriculum for elementary school children. Concepts and skills in the teaching of reading, math, language arts, social studies, and science. Modification of instructional methods and materials for children with disabilities. Demonstration lessons will be used to highlight principles of development and modification of curriculum for elementary school children with disabilities.
Prerequisites: GED 201; GED 301 and GED 303 or GED 304. 3 credits

SpEd 310 Principles of Classroom Management for Students with Disabilities, Grades 1-6 (Spring)
Setting up the physical environment of the classroom to maximize learning productivity and prevent unnecessary behavior problems. Review of different models of intervention approaches for handling difficult behavior in the elementary school. The teacher's role in reducing conflicts, teaching social skills, and facilitating cooperative group living. The importance of the teacher's self-awareness in teacher-student interaction. Critical incidents will be used to develop specific guidelines for effective teacher interventions.
Prerequisites: GED 201; GED 301 and GED 303 or GED 304. 3 credits

SpEd 313 Developmentally Appropriate Learning Experiences for Young Exceptional Children (Fall, Spring)
Introduction to educational programs for infants, toddlers, pre-K students, kindergarten students, and first and second graders with disabilities. Review of developmentally appropriate integrated curriculum content; materials and activities in language arts, books, music, art, blocks, sand, water play, cooking and other play activities; parents as collaborators. Comparison of early intervention and early childhood special education programs reflected in Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) and Individualized Education Plan (IEP). Comparison of least restrictive environment and natural environment approaches.
Prerequisite: GED 311. 3 credits

SpEd 314 Addressing Challenging Behaviors of Young Exceptional Children (Fall, Spring)
Setting up and managing play and learning activities in safe and developmentally appropriate environments for infants, toddlers, pre-K students, kindergarten students, and first and second graders with disabilities. Understanding temperament and its impact on the parent-child and teacher-child relationship; supporting positive parent-child interactions. Role of the teacher in guiding young children in the development of self-discipline and communication and social skills necessary for constructive peer relations and group living; interventions for prevention and management of challenging behaviors.
Prerequisite: GED 311. 3 credits

SpEd 418 Field Experience and Student Teaching II (Fall, Spring)
Students complete 100 hours of field experience in special education with one of the three developmental groups (combined field experience/student teaching in special education must cover all three developmental levels). Students also complete two 20-day student teaching experiences in special education with one or two of the three developmental groups. Students are observed and evaluated by a Touro faculty member.
Prerequisite: Completion of education courses, approval of Education Chair, receipt of a passing grade on the STAT exam. 3 credits

SpEd 419 Student Teaching, Grades 1-6 (Fall, Spring)
Student teaching consists of two twenty-day student teaching experiences in special education covering the two developmental levels, grades 1-3 and grades 4-6. Student teachers are supervised by appropriately certified cooperating teachers. Students are also observed and evaluated by Touro faculty.
Student teaching placements are made in which students can increasingly take responsibility for teaching activities, including reaching the point of presenting academic lessons and activities independently. Students keep logs of their hours and experiences. Student teaching experiences are accompanied by regularly scheduled classes. Instruction is provided and discussion encouraged on professional issues ranging from creating lesson plans to arranging a professional portfolio and resume. Particular emphasis is placed on self-awareness and analysis of one's own teaching performance.
Prerequisite: Completion of education courses, approval of Education Chair, receipt of a passing grade on the STAT exam. 3 credits

SpEd 602 Introduction to Special Education (Fall, Spring)
The historical background to current approaches to teaching children with disabilities; special education and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act; current theories and methodologies in special education; inclusion and the concept of the least restrictive environment; early intervention; special education programs, curricula, classroom management and technologies; educational challenges and instructional approaches with children whose disabilities are associated with mental retardation, physical and sensory impairments, language delays, emotional disturbance, and learning disabilities; introduction to approaches and debates on reading and language arts instruction for native English speakers and English language learners.
Prerequisite: Education Department approval, upper division status, admission into the Education Concentration Program (ECP). 3 credits


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