NYSCAS: New York School of Career and Applied Studies

Computer Science

Courses in the department enable students to earn certificates and associate and baccalaureate degrees in Business Management and Administration with concentrations in Information Systems. They also help students fulfill requirements in Business, Education and Liberal Arts.

FACULTY

Full-time

I. Herskowitz, Chair; P. Bina, Deputy Chair (NYSCAS); S. Fink, Deputy Chair (Lander Colleges of Arts and Sciences); J. Epstein, Deputy Chair; A. Mahat (Coordinator, Information Technology, Network Administration and Security), I. Berman, Y. Bernadsky, A. Bina, C. Canales, P. Charach, S. DeCastro (Coordinator, Desktop Publishing program), A. Eidlisz, P. Estrada, L. Gleiberman, A. Grund, M. Gutherc, J. Herbst, J. Humphrey, A. Inoyatov, A. Ivanov, R. Kariyev, V. Khaitov, U. Jinna, D. Morgulis, S. Musheyev, A. O.Hara, Y. Pinkhasov, M. Plonczak, A. Raynes, J. Robinson, A Spira, A. Stasyuk, C. Steen, T. Templeton, E. Yakubov, M. Yarmish, S. Bhusal, A. Pascual.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Selected courses may be offered on an intensive basis with additional hours of laboratory instruction. Such courses are identified with the suffix "Z" by the Registrar.

Note: A related one-credit laboratory, "topics," or workshop course may be offered with certain three-credit Computer Science courses.

GCO 120 Fundamentals of Computers with Microcomputer Applications (Fall, Spring)
This course discusses the basic principles of computer literacy. The student is exposed to extensive computer terminology and a thorough discussion of computer theory, including the Internet. In addition, a hands-on computer lab is incorporated into the course. The student will learn Windows operating systems, word processing, spreadsheet and presentation application software. Outside lab time is required for class assignments. The software will be updated to reflect the constantly changing technologies available.
4 credits

GCO 122 Computer Literacy and Information Retrieval (Fall, Spring)
Students examine basic computer topics and terminology, with special emphasis on electronic information retrieval, as they explore ways to utilize information retrieval technology to keep abreast of developments in their various academic disciplines. To this end, computer hardware and software are discussed, along with personal computer applications such as Microsoft Office. Internet topics, such as advanced search techniques, constructing deep searches, finding speciality information, newsgroups and mailing lists, are examined in detail. A capstone project is the preparation of a research project, making use of both traditional as well as electronic methods of research.
3 credits

GCO 126 The Computer Milieu (Upon Request)
This course is designed to introduce the most fundamental computer concepts and terminology in conjunction with a programming- or hardware-oriented curriculum. The basic terminology of hardware, software, data communications, the Internet, and the World Wide Web is discussed.
1 credit

GCO 130 Survey of PC Applications (Fall, Spring) (This course is no longer offered)
This is an introductory course specifically designed for management and office technology. Windows operating system, electronic word processing, spreadsheet applications and presentation programs are discussed in detail with extensive lab exercises. Software will be updated to reflect current popular application programs used in the business world. Outside lab time will be required for class assignments. This course may not be used to satisfy requirements for students with Data Communications or Programming concentrations.
4 credits

GCO 138 Computer Theory with Operating System (This course is no longer offered)
This course covers advanced principles of computer literacy for computer majors. In depth discussion of DOS and Networking Computer concepts. A review of current database application program fundamentals with lab exercises is included. This is an intensive course with expanded teaching hours to accommodate all the material that must be covered. Outside lab time is required for class assignments.
Prerequisite: GCO 120. 4 credits

GCO 141 Introduction to Programming (Fall, Spring)
This course is a concentrated orientation course dealing with algorithms, programs, and basic processing of quantitative character information. Emphasis is placed on flow-charting techniques and general programming concepts to include: instruction types, loops, arrays, input/output blocks, functions, pointers, arithmetic operations, debugging and verification of programs. Applications are selected from the areas of business, accounting, mathematics/statistics and the social sciences.
Prerequisite: GCO 120 OR Co-requisites GCO 147 and co-requisites GCO 120. 3 credits

GCO 147 Computer Hardware, Software and System Security (Fall, Spring)
This course provides an introduction to the computer hardware, software, and security skills needed to meet the growing demand for entry - level information technology (IT) professionals. It covers the fundamentals of PC computer technology, networking, and security. Students develop working knowledge of how computers operate, how to assemble computers, how to troubleshoot hardware and software issues, and implement computer system security.
Co-requisite: GCO 120. 3 credits

GCO 156 Electronics for Computers and Data Communications(Fall, Spring)
This course teaches students the electronic fundamentals required for modern day computers systems and telecommunications topics. The course allows the student to build technical intuition specifically for the rapidly changing world of IT technology for both computer and telecommunication technology.
Prerequisite: GCO 120, Co-requisites GCO 147. 3 credits

GCO 162 Advanced Survey of Business PC Applications (formerly GCO 148) (Fall, Spring)
This course is a continuation of the Excel and Powerpoint applications taught in GCO 130. A current accounting application is also taught. The goal is to fully expose business students to the PC applications available to them, so that they may integrate these applications into their studies and on the job.
Prerequisites: GCO 120 and GBM 101. 3 credits

GCO 201 Digital Electronics (This course is no longer offered)
This course is designed to provide students with knowledge of the theoretical background and experimental application of modern electronic devices and circuitry. Students develop knowledge of analog and digital electronics concepts and techniques as a fundamental background for understanding networked computer systems. The course emphasizes the basic principles, theorems, and circuit behavior followed by applications and troubleshooting techniques. Topics include concept of electricity, direct current circuitry, Ohm's Law and Kirchoff's rules; alternating current circuits, capacitance and inductance, complex impedance; diodes, bipolar transistor, single and multiple voltage amplifiers; binary logic, logic gates, resistor, diode and transistor-transistor logic; digital memory; analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters.
Prerequisite: GCO 138 OR GCO 147. 3 credits

GCO 202 Networking Essentials (Fall, Spring)
Networking Essentials defines "Data Communications" and related terminology; presents real world examples of Data Communications; describes network components & their corresponding functions; explains data flow throughout a network, and generates a keen understanding of how "connection" and "communication" are achieved in a network. The students will develop the understanding of how information flows throughout a network, from sender to receiver. Not open to students who have taken GCO 353.
Prerequisites: GCO147. 3 credits.

GCO 220 Java I (Annually)
This course introduces students to Object Oriented Programming (OOP) using Java. Students will create Java applets and applications. The use of the Java language in developing Internet applications will be emphasized.
Prerequisite: GCO 141 or exemption. 3 credits

GCO 222 Java II (Annually)
This course teaches students to create programs using advanced Java features such as: multithreading, java collections, networking, database, remote objects using Client/Server organization and JavaBeans technology.
Prerequisite: GCO 220. 3 credits

GCO 223 Wide Area Networks I (Fall, Spring)
This is the first of four semester courses designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience in current and emerging networking technology. Instruction includes safety, networking, network terminology and protocols, network standards, LANs, WANs, OSI model, cabling, cabling tools, routers, star topology, and IP addressing. Particular emphasis is given to the use of decision-making and problem-solving techniques in applying science, mathematics, communication, and social studies concepts to solve networking problems.
Prerequisites: GCO 147. Co-requisites GCO 125. 3 credits

GCO 224 Wide Area Networks II (Fall, Spring)
This is the second of four semester courses designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience in current and emerging networking technology. Instruction includes networking, network protocols and standards, LANs, WANs, OSI model, Ethernet, Token Ring, Fiber Distributed Data Interface, TCP/IP Addressing Protocol, routing, router programming, dynamic routing, and the network administrator's role and function.
Prerequisite: GCO 223. C0-requisites GC) 127. 3 credits

GCO 228 Advanced Computer Hardware and System Security (Fall, Spring)
This course covers the advanced concepts of PC computer technology, networking, and security. It emphasizes the advance practical application of skills and procedures needed for hardware and software installations, upgrades, troubleshooting systems and implementing computer system security. Additional topics covered include laptops and portable devices, wireless connectivity and basic implementation skills, system and network security, safety and environmental issues, applied network configuration and troubleshooting skills.
Prerequisite: GCO 147 Computer Hardware and System Security. 3 credits

GCO 230 C++ Programming Language (Upon request)
This course focuses on the vocabulary and syntax of C++ by reading, writing and revising real problems. Topics include: data types, operators and expressions, control flow, functions and program structure, printers and data structures and I/O. Extensive lab time is scheduled.
Prerequisite: GCO 141 or exemption. 3 credits

GCO 231 Fundamentals of Network Security (Fall, Spring)
This course focuses on the overall security policy with emphasis on hands-on skills in the areas of secure perimeter, secure connectivity, secure management, identity services, and intrusion detection. The course teaches students to design and implement security solutions that will reduce the risk of revenue loss and vulnerability.
Prerequisite: GCO 202. 3 credits

GCO 232 Advanced Programming (Upon request)
In this course students learn disciplined programming techniques including style analysis and structured programming. Advanced programming concepts including structures, advanced topics in pointers, file I/O, physical organization of files, files structures, file maintenance. Experience in selecting and using sequential data structures. Concepts and experience in selecting and using input-output techniques for sequential and non-sequential file processing.
Prerequisite: GCO 141. 3 credits

GCO 234 LAN Applications I (Fall, Spring)
In this course students practice on-line network instruction lab exercises utilizing LAN software. Students become hands-on familiar with a popular LAN software package including installation, utilization service, support and troubleshooting. The software will be adjusted to reflect the constantly changing technologies available. Lab time is required for class assignments.
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: GCO 202. Co-requisite: GCO 354. 1 credit

GCO 236 Advanced LAN Applications II (Fall, Spring)
In this course students work with on-line networking instruction lab exercises using LAN software. Students become hands-on familiar with a 2nd popular LAN software package including installation, utilization service, support and troubleshooting. The software will be adjusted to reflect the constantly changing technologies available. Lab time is required for class assignments.
Prerequisite: GCO 234. Co-requisite: GCO 355. 1 credit

GCO 240 Microcomputer Operating Systems (upon request)
This course explores one or more microcomputer operating systems in detail, including troubleshooting, file and folder management, sharing information, running applications and customizing windows. Hardware, e-mail and managing network resources are also included.
Prerequisites: GCO 147. 3 credits

GCO 243 Operating Systems (Upon request)
Students are exposed to design and implementation of operating systems. Multi-programming, multi-processing, time-sharing. Communications, conversational computing, computer networks, memory protection, process management, interrupts segmentation, inter-process communications, paging, virtual memories, memory management. The deadlock problem, detection, recovery and prevention methods. Input, output, buffering, channels. Lab time is required for class assignments. The software will be adjusted to reflect the constantly changing technologies available.
Prerequisites: GCO 147. 3 credits

GCO 245 UNIX Operating Systems (Annually)
Topics in this course include introductory and advanced features of the UNIX operating system. Students gain valuable in-depth knowledge of the entire UNIX environment and the inner workings of this operating system.
Prerequisite: GCO 141. 3 credits

GCO 250 Advanced UNIX Operating System (Upon request)
This course is designed for the student who is familiar with the basics of the UNIX operating system and desires to gain experience with advanced UNIX development and inter-process communication. The course includes a lab.
Prerequisite: GCO 245. 3 credits

GCO 254 Database Applications (upon request)
This course explores in detail a current database application program with extensive lab exercises. An advanced review of a Windows Operating Systems is included. Outside lab time is required for class assignments. Software will be adjusted to reflect constantly changing application technology.
Prerequisites: CO 141. 3 credits

GCO 260 Computer Architecture (Fall, Spring)
This course exposes students to basic digital circuits, Boolean algebra, combinational logic, data representation, transfer and digital arithmetic. Digital storage and accessing, control functions, input-output facilities, microprogramming, system organization, and reliability. Description and simulation techniques. Features needed for multi-programming, multi-processing, and real-time systems. Lab time is required for class assignments.
Prerequisites: GCO 156. 3 credits

GCO 264 Data Structures I (Fall, Spring)
This course explores the more advanced concepts of the Object-Oriented Design and Programming paradigm including operator overloading, inheritance versus composition, polymorphism, run-time compile time binding, multiple inheritance, shallow versus deep copying, exception handling, and function templates. In addition, the basic file I/O operations will be covered. Some basic data structures such as stack and queues may be introduced as well. Students develop applications that implement these object-oriented concepts using C++.
Prerequisite: GCO 230 or GCO 220. 3 credits

GCO 268 Wide Area Networks III (Upon request)
This is the third of four courses designed to introduce new content and extend previously learned networking skills. Instruction introduces and extends the student's knowledge and practical experience with switches, Local Area Networks (LAN's) and Virtual Local Area Networks (VLAN's) design, configuration and maintenance. Students develop skills related to configuring LAN's, WAN's, Novell networks, Internetwork Packet Exchange (IPX) routing and Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (IGRP) protocol and network troubleshooting.
Prerequisite: GCO 224. 3 credits

GCO 270 Visual Basic I (Upon request)
This course discusses event-driven programming, using the Visual Basic programming Language. The difference between this type of programming, and sequential programming is examined. Building blocks within the user interface, various properties and functions, assigning access keys, TOE charts and variables are some of the topics discussed. This course includes extensive lab time.
Prerequisite: GCO 141 or exemption. 3 credits

GCO 272 Visual Basic II (Upon request)
The student's understanding of the techniques of event-driven programming using the Visual Basic programming language is explored and enhanced. More advanced topics such as sorting data, and relationships to databases are discussed.
Prerequisite: GCO 270. 3 credits

GCO 275 Advanced Internet Tools and Web Page Design (Fall, Spring)
This course involves the Computer Science major with a higher level of HTML by introducing advanced concepts and design techniques through an online learning environment. Due to the advanced nature of this course, the student will need a computer, an Internet connection, Notepad or WordPad (or SimpleText for the Mac), an FTP application and the desire to learn advanced topics such as table commands, image manipulation, on-line forms, and JavaScript. The development platform for this class is writing HTML and web programming, as opposed to Netscape or Internet Explorer-based publishing with a Web page editor.
Prerequisite: GCO 141. 3 credits

GCO 311 Wireless Networks (Fall, Spring)
This course explains the general principles of wireless networking including architectures, protocols, and standards. It describes concepts, technology, and applications of wireless networking as used in current and next-generation wireless networks. It explains the engineering aspects of wireless networks functions and designs.
Prerequisite: GCO 202. 3 credits

GCO 315 Voice over IP Fundamentals(Upon request)
This course provides students with the in-depth knowledge of Voice over IP(VoIP) and the TCP/IP networking protocol that VoIP is based on. VoIP technology, or making telephone calls over data networks such as the Internet, is now expected to become the standard telephone technology. This course provides the integral information needed by Information Technology students to understand and plan for future implementations of Voice over IP.
Prerequisite: GCO 223. 3 credits

GCO 321 Computer Forensics (Fall, Spring)
This course introduces students to the collection, preservation, presentation and preparation of computer based evidence for the purposes of criminal law enforcement or civil litigation. These activities define the central roles of computer forensic practitioners involved in investigating computer crime scenes and torts involving computers. Students will be prepared to assist in the formulation and implementation of organizational computer forensics preparedness policies, to determine the necessity for forensic procedures, extend governance processes to allow for proper future forensic investigations, and to be contributing members of computer forensics investigation teams.
Prerequisite: GCO 231 3 credits

GCO 325 Advance Network Security (Fall, Spring)
This course focuses on the managerial aspects of information security and assurance for network administrators. It provides a study of information security concerns and techniques to protect against the risk of revenue loss and vulnerability utilized in current business environment. Topics covered include access control models, information security governance, and information security program assessment and metrics. .
Prerequisite: GCO 231. 3 credits

GCO 343 Database Concepts & Design (Fall, Spring)
This course provides students with an informed and critical perspective on current alternatives in the Database Management Systems (DBMS) area. Topics include: architecture; hierarchic, network and relational database approaches with respect to database structure, integrity, userview mechanisms, data storage and access techniques. Data manipulation; normalization and file structures versus DBMS; SQL & QBE.
Prerequisites: GCO 141 or GCO 220 or GCO 230 or GCO 270. 3 credits

GCO 344 Relational Database (Upon request)
This course provides students with a critical understanding of relational database concepts, theory and contemporary relational database management systems. Topics include: query language, distributed database management systems relational database design and trends in database.
Prerequisites: GCO 220 or GCO 230 or GCO 232 or GCO 270. 3 credits

GCO 346 Business Programming (Upon request)
This course is a comprehensive overview of a popular business-related programming language for experienced programmers. Business applications are emphasized. Outside lab time is required to complete programming exercises. The programming language will be adjusted to reflect popular programming trends.
Prerequisites: GCO 220 or GCO 230 or GCO 270. 3 credits

GCO 351 Computer Hardware (This course is no longer offered)
An introduction to the hardware levels comprising the structure of a computer. A discussion of the components, operations and data types of each level, starting with the electronic gates and up through the operating system. Students develop an understanding of how the hardware building blocks interface with sophisticated software to enable the computer to operate, as well as how to troubleshoot hardware problems.
Prerequisites: GCO 138 or GCO 147. 3 credits

GCO 352 Structured Systems Analysis (Annually)
This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the system life cycle with a strong emphasis on the analysis phase. Topics include: data flow diagrams (a graphic tool that represents data interfaces and functions); building system models using data flow diagrams; data dictionary; introduction to the CASE tools; and AD/cycle. Students participate in practical case studies and presentations in system analysis.
Prerequisite: GCO 264. 3 credits

GCO 353 Data Communications (Fall, Spring)
This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of present and future trends in the communications industry. The course discusses transmission media, transmission impairments, information structure, OSI model, LANs, WANs, modems, interfaces, standards, and protocols.
Prerequisite: GCO 202. 3 credits

GCO 354 Local Area Network Concepts and Software (Fall, Spring)
This course provides students with a basic understanding of various major hardware and software products and designs related to a Local Area Network (LANs). The course discusses a popular LAN software product involving topologies, access protocols, security and LAN installation with service and support. Lab time is required to complete class assignments. The software will be adjusted to reflect the constantly changing technologies available.
Co-requisite: GCO 234. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: GCO 202. 3 credits

GCO 355 Advanced Local Area Network Architectures and Software (Fall, Spring)
This course presents various advanced LAN architectures and industry standards. Details of the IEEE standards are covered along with networking protocol suites - SNA and NETBIOS - as they apply to LANs. The course discusses software coexistence, integrating networking, management products and a second popular LAN software product. Lab time is required to complete class assignments. The software will be adjusted to reflect the constantly changing technologies available.
Prerequisite: GCO 354. Co-requisite: GCO 236. 3 credits

GCO 356 Advanced Topics in Local Area Networks (upon request)
This course focuses on intensive hands-on training and advanced troubleshooting issues, and discusses the current version of Windows Professional and Windows Server. The course prepares students for the MCP exam.
Prerequisite: GCO 355. 3 credits

GCO 364 Data Structures II (Annually)
This course discusses representations, implementation and applications of stacks, queues, linked lists, trees and graphics, as well as recursion, sorting and searching techniques. There is minimal lab time.
Prerequisite: GCO 264. 3 credits

GCO 366 Projects in Programming (Upon Request)
This course teaches students to apply all previously-learned concepts in object-oriented design using Visual Basic. Students design and implement a complete package for common business needs under the supervision of the faculty advisor.
Prerequisites: GCO 272 or GCO 222 or GCO 346 or GCO 364. 3 credits

GCO 368 Advanced Topics in Object-Oriented Programming (upon request)
This course utilizes a current object-oriented programming language to explore advanced OOP concepts such as: classes, objects and encapsulation; inheritance and polymorphism; static and dynamic binding; and case studies in OOP implementation.
Prerequisite: GCO 364. 3 credits

GCO 370 Wide Area Networks IV (Upon Request)
The fourth of four courses designed to introduce new content and extend previously-learned networking skills. Extends the student's knowledge and practical experience with Wide Area Networks (WANs), Integrated Services Data Networks (ISDN) and Point-to-Point Protocols (PPP), and Frame Relay design, configuration and maintenance. Students develop skills related to configuring WAN's, ISDN, PPP and Frame Relay protocols, and network troubleshooting.
Prerequisite GCO 268. 3 credits

GCO 443 Advanced Topics in Database (Upon request)
This course will cover features of Microsoft SQL Server 6.5. Students will learn the use of such utilities as Enterprise Manager and ISQL/W. This course includes expanded coverage of Transact-SQL, Stored Procedures, and Triggers.
Prerequisites: GCO 343 or GCO 344. 3 credits

GCO 451 Special Topics in Computer Science (upon request)
Topics of current interest in computer science. Offerings include software engineering, microprocessors, computer graphics, system simulation, expert systems, and local area networks.
Prerequisites: GCO 232 or GCO 230 or GCO 270 or GCO 220. 1-4 credits

GCO 462 Advanced Topics in Data Communications (upon request)
Topics of current interest in data communications. Offerings include specific LAN software, telecommunications, emerging technologies, and electronics.
Prerequisite: GCO 355. 3 credits

GCO 481-482 Independent Study (upon request)
Independent Study project supervised by a faculty member.
Prerequisites: Senior status and departmental permission. 1-4 credits

GCO 494 Senior Honors Project in Computer Science (upon request)
Students complete a senior research project supervised by a faculty member. Achievement is measured by demonstrable attainment of project goals. A detailed written report is required.
Prerequisites: Senior status and departmental approval. 3 credits

GCO 498 Internship in Computer Science (upon request)
Students complete a commercial business project requiring a minimum of 9 hours of work per week. Internships complement students' classroom training and prepare them for the business world. Achievement is measured by demonstrable attainment of project goals and an evaluation by the business's management.
Prerequisites: Senior status and departmental approval. 3 credits

NOTE: In addition to the 1-credit laboratories noted on page 192, the following 1-credit laboratories and computer language tutorials are also available:

Computer Applications and Language Tutorials (1 credit)
GCO 214 Spreadsheet Tutorial
GCO 215 Database Tutorial
GCO 216 Advanced Spreadsheet Tutorial
GCO 218 Advanced Database Tutorial

DIGITAL MULTIMEDIA DESIGN

GCD 130 Survey of PC Applications (Fall, Spring)

This course introduces students to the concepts and much of the terminology unique to the computer-based design world. Operating systems with related applications, file types and resolutions, and a general understanding of hardware will be covered. Lab time will be allotted for this course.
Prerequisite: None. 4 credits

GCD 150 Foundations of Design I (Annual)
In this course, students are taught the basics of two-dimensional design as related to graphic design and digital multimedia design. The basic vocabulary of visual form is taught, and materials and board skills necessary for these projects are explored. Overall, the development of students' visual creative skill is emphasized. Students will produce projects which reflect their understanding of the concepts and skills taught.
Prerequisite: None. 3 credits

GCD 155 Foundations of Design II (Annual)
In this course, students' knowledge of basic design is extended into the area of graphic communication and typography in order to develop a framework on which to do professional graphic and web design. The course explores the following concepts: visual form as communication; the relationship of content and visual form; typography as a visual form; basic technical typography; a brief history of graphic communication and typography; and a working methodology for problem solving. The course requires students to produce projects which reflect their cumulative understanding of the concepts and skills taught.
Prerequisite: GCD 150. 3 credits

GCD 201 Exploring Typography (Annual)
In this course, students study how human "markings" evolved from the earliest times to the present digital era, focusing on how letterforms began and how they've changed over time. Class projects concentrate on analyzing the structure of type form and how to use it effectively for creative visual communication. The course also highlights how to achieve visual effectiveness in the relationship of text to images on a page or screen.
Prerequisite: NOne. 3 credits

GCD 221 Photography (Annual)
This course uses camera and photographic processes as vehicles for artistic expression, perceptual discovery and design, and explores traditional and experimental use of photographic processes. Students provide their own cameras and basic materials.
Prerequisites: none. 3 credits

GCD 230 Digital Multimedia Design I (Annual)
This course introduces students to the principles of digital multimedia design, graphic design, page layout and typography. The relationship of typography to images and graphics in a full-color environment are explored through the assignment of various projects. Output requirements and the correct preparation of files are discussed. Good design and appropriate solutions for the problems presented are also encouraged. The software introduced to students is monitored and adjusted to reflect constantly changing technologies in the field.
Prerequisite: None. 3 credits

GCD 231 Digital Multimedia Design II (Annual)
This course focuses on advanced features of page layout software. Students build upon previous knowledge of the software by designing material for a business or advertising environment, including stationery, business cards, corporate identity, logos and brochures. This class includes a workshop/lab; topics covered include scanning, color separation and setting up files for pre-press. Lab time is necessary for class assignments and students present their work during class critiques. The software introduced to students is monitored and adjusted to reflect constantly changing technologies in the field.
Prerequisite: GCD 230 and 235 . 3 credits

GCD 235 Computer Graphic Design I (formerly GCD 165) (Annual)
This course introduces students to the use of vector-based software, to create illustrations, use typographic design principles, create logos, and incorporate images with graphics. The focus is on understanding the use of software as an illustration tool and on beginning to develop original ideas. Design principles, use of color and composition are also emphasized. Lab time is necessary for class assignments.
Prerequisites: None. 3 credits

GCD 236 Computer Graphic Design II (Annual)
This course introduces students to working with images in a digital environment. Students receive an overview of tools, scanning, color correction, image size resolution, and digital compositing. Students work on projects that simulate "real world" design concepts and then present their work during class critiques. Lab time is necessary for class assignments.
Prerequisites: GCD 230 and 235. 3 credits

GCD 262 Digital Multimedia Design III (Annual)
Page layout and the implementation of images and illustrations into a multipage document are the major focus of this course. The pre-press process, the preparation of images for output, and the use of crop marks, bleeds, and color separation are discussed. Students are expected to work independently on projects in addition to class meetings. Lab time is necessary for class assignments, and students present their work during class critiques.
Prerequisite:GCD 155, GCD 231, 236. 3 credits

GCD 263 Web Page Design I w/Lab (Annual)
This course is a basic introduction to webpage design. Students learn the skills needed to author and publish documents using HTML, CSS and authoring software. Design skills are applied towards webpage construction. Students learn to apply their knowledge of print design and computer software to webpage design. Lab time outside of class is necessary for class assignments.
Prerequisites: GCD 155, GCD 231 and GCD 236. 3 credits

GCD 264 Web Page Design II (Annual)
This course covers topics such as client interactions, case studies, marketing strategies for websites, navigation design, SEO, responsive design, team projects, project planning and user testing. Students are required to create a minimum of one fully functional website for review. Advanced web design features are also explored.
Prerequisite: GCD 263 and GCD 267. 3 credits

GCD 267 Computer Graphic Design III (Annual)
In this course, students use advanced software tools to create, correct, and manipulate images on a professional level. Emphasis is placed on developing visual literacy in color and image manipulation. The development of the sequential thinking required to do advanced work is stressed. Lab time is necessary for class assignments.
Prerequisite: GCD 236. 3 credits

GCD 291 Principles of 2D Animation (Annual)
This course explores the modern techniques and applications of 2-D animation and its technological implementation. Students study animation with emphases on production techniques, both technological and artistic, and on motion analysis, with an eye toward producing realistic/believable motion and performances.
Prerequisites: GCD 236. 3 credits

GCD 302 Web Design III (Annual)
This course covers advanced techniques in website design focusing on the functionality of interactive sites and effective use of text, graphics, and animation. Students are required to upload their original, functional websites for evaluation.
Prerequisite: GCD 264 and 267. 3 credits

GCD 320 Information Design (Annual)
The visual display and interpretation of quantitative information are increasingly critical in the information age. This course is concerned with the graphic designer's contribution to the handling of complex quantitative data, both in printed designs and on the internet.
Prerequisite: GCD 262. 3 credits

GCD 335 Advanced Design Studio (Annual)
This course thoroughly acquaints students with traditional design skills necessary for the creation of professional-level designs. An emphasis is placed on mechanical techniques, conceptual thinking, and expanding students' visual vocabulary. Thumbnails, roughs, and mechanical layouts are taught, including the use of typography, hand lettering, color usage, audience research and targeting, and copy writing.
Prerequisites: GCD 262 and GCD 267. 3 credits

GCD 357 Computer Illustration (Annual)
In this course, students use a vector-based computer drawing program as a visual thinking tool, with experimental approaches to a variety of applied illustration problems. The focus is on conceptualizing and executing illustrative designs appropriate to a number of media formats (advertising, editorial, informational). Students are encouraged to use innovation while honing skills in conceptualization, technique, design and presentation of computer illustrations. Projects completed in this course add significantly to the student designer's portfolio.
Prerequisites: GCD 236. 3 credits

GCD 360 Video Production Studio (Annual)
This class is an introduction to shooting and editing digital video. Students create projects composing multilayered videos for DVD and the web. Sound editing, transfer of analog to digital, video graphics and streaming media are explored in this course. Pre-production planning and storyboarding will be stressed.
Prerequisite: GCD 302 or departmental approval. Prerequisite: None. 3 credits

GCD 420 Authoring Languages (Fall, Spring)
Introduction to programming languages for interactive digital media. Each semester offering is devoted to a specific language. This course may include Java script and other interactive programming languages. Intended only for those who are already fluent in at least one programming language.
Prerequisites: GCO 230 or GCO 272 or GCO 222, or GCO 232 or a second-level programming course or equivalent. 3 credits

GCD 451 Special Topics (Upon Request)
This course will cover topics of current interest in digital multimedia design. Possible offerings include the business of graphic design, digital 3-D design, streaming technology for webcasting, or multimedia presentation.
Prerequisite: Departmental approval. 3 credits

GCD 480 Senior Project (upon request)
This is an advanced studio course devoted to individual portfolio-quality projects. Students choose one field of design in which to concentrate in developing a portfolio project for the semester. Areas of focus may be multimedia design, website print design (advertising, corporate, information, etc.) or other related design fields, with faculty approval.
Prerequisite: Departmental approval. 3 credits

GCD 490 Senior Portfolio (Annual)
Students design professional pieces that will enhance their chances of attaining a position in fields related to digital multimedia design. Magazine and catalogs, book cover design, package design, web design, and corporate identity are among the projects required for this course. Discussions on effective resumes and how to prepare for job interviews, as well as the job search, are also explored. Students will present portfolios to faculty members of the Digital Multimedia Design Program for critique and evaluation throughout the semester. Presentation skills, such as mounting and matting work, will be covered. Lab time will be required for class assignments.
Prerequisites: GCD 262,264,267 and 335 / Co-requisite: GCD 302. 3 credits

GCD 498 Internship in Multimedia Design (Fall, Spring)
This course requires students to complete an internship in a digital multimedia design or web-related field. Weekly logs and design work are required for internships and are reviewed by members of the Digital Multimedia Design Department faculty at the completion of the internship. The purpose of the internship is to provide students with practical experience to complement their coursework.

DIGITAL MEDIA ARTS

GBM 125 The Music Business (Fall, Spring)
This course covers issues of major importance to everyone seeking a livelihood in the music business. Topics include copyright, recording and production contracts, publishing and business organizations.
3 credits

GCO 123 Basics of Digital Applications (Fall, Spring)
A brief history of computing devices is given before moving on to contemporary computers and related devices. The hands-on component has each student at a Macintosh computer station which includes the needed software linked to a proprietary network from which all student work projects can be accessed.
3 credits

GCO 128 Audio Electronics (Fall, Spring)
This course lays the groundwork for the basics of audio technology, electricity, and electronics. Students learn the fundamentals of DC and AC electronics as applied to audio equipment.
3 credits

GCO 149 Acoustics and Sound (Fall, Spring)
This course explains the basics of sound propagation, human hearing and perception, the physical principles of music and musical instruments, as well as acoustics and recording studio design principles.
3 credits

GCO 153 Electronic Systems (Microphones, Amplifiers and Speakers) (Fall, Spring)
Students study a wide variety of microphones, speakers, and amps, including their specifications, characteristics, and uses. Placement of microphones and speakers is discussed and demonstrated in class.
3 credits

GCO 154 Audio Processing Devices and Mixing (Fall, Spring)
Topics include: mixing consoles, split and inline routing, dynamic control with compressors and expanders, equalization, time domains which include delay and reverb, routing, patch bays and signal flow. The hands-on component has each student at his or her own audio station.
3 credits

GCO 226 Digital Audio Mixing Advanced (Fall, Spring)
Students work on multi-track mixing in the professional digital environment. Emphasis is on automation, using plug-ins, EQ, sends, reverb, delay, compression and gating, special effects such as time compression and expansion, phase-shifting, as well as advanced multi-track editing. The hands-on component has each student at a Macintosh computer station which includes the necessary software linked to a proprietary network from which all student work projects can be accessed.
3 credits

GCO 227 MIDI Applications, Synthesis and Virtual Synthesis (Fall, Spring)
This course covers the history of MIDI and electronic music and its devices, from the Theremin to the Moog to the latest in digital audio sampling and virtual synthesis. The hands-on component has each student at a Macintosh computer station which includes the necessary software linked to a proprietary network from which all student work projects can be accessed. Equipment includes: MIDI keyboard, MIDI interface, MIDI synthesizer, and sequencing software as well as virtual synthesis software.
3 credits

GCO 269 Post-Production (Fall, Spring)
The combining of sound and picture: Students work with video that is synchronized to computer-based digital audio software. Working at a Macintosh computer station, students create finished projects that combine digital multi-track audio and video. The lecture component includes information central to students. future audio productions.
3 credits

GCO 285 The Recording Studio (Fall, Spring)
Students apply the principles and techniques they have studied by engineering actual recordings and mixes in the professional multi-track environment using computer-based audio software. Musicians are recorded by student engineers, from the laying down of tracks through the final mix.
3 credits


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BS/DO Science Honors Track
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