http://legacy.touro.edu/edgrad/geology/courses.asp
The Center About The Center Master's Program Library
Program Overview Admissions Requirement Courses Contact & Application

Course Descriptions

First Year Course Schedule
Second Year Course Schedule

ENS 600 Introduction to Environmental Science

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of environmental science and to the environmental issues and challenges that face us today. Topics presented in this course include a description of the Earth's major ecosystems, environmental problems associated with the extraction of natural and energy resources, the finite nature of natural and energy resources, population growth and population dynamics, environmental health and health problems associated with pollution, sustainable development and land use.

3 credits


ENS 601 Geology

This course is designed to introduce students to geology and the geological processes that occur within the Earth and at the surface of the Earth. The following geologic topics will be covered in detail in this course: mineralogy, igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary processes, plate tectonics, weathering, mass wasting, the hydrologic cycle and glaciation.

3 credits


ENS 602 Oceanography

This course presents a broad overview of the World's oceans. The first part of this course deals with such fundamentals as the formation of oceans, the role of plate tectonics in shaping the World's oceans, marine sedimentation and the physical and chemical properties of sea water. Additional topics presented in this course include ocean circulation systems, the interaction of the ocean and the atmosphere, wave and tide dynamics, shoreline processes and the distribution of life in the pelagic and benthic environments. Environmental issues concerning the World's oceans will also be addressed in this course.

3 credits


ENS 603 Climatology and Global Warming

Climatology is the study of weather conditions averaged over a long period of time. Climatologists are interested in both natural and anthropogenic causes of long term climate change and the environmental and social impacts of these changes. Long term weather patterns are affected by atmospheric and oceanic circulation patterns, the addition of gases and particulate matter into the atmosphere and the interaction of the atmosphere with both the land and sea surface. The current climatic trend of global warming is strongly believed to be the result of the release of green house gases by man and may severely impact the World in the immediate future.

3 credits


ENS 700 Environmental Geology

Environmental Geology is the study of the interaction between people and the physical environment. This science studies natural geologic hazards, such as flooding, earthquakes and landslides, and geologic hazards resulting from the modification of the land surface, which occurs as a result of changes in land use due to construction or farming activity. Additional concerns of environmental geologists are the effects of the release of pollutants, and changes to the Earth brought about by land use and the harvesting of natural resources.

3 credits


ENS 701 Environmental Hydrology

This course will examine the occurrence and movement of water, both through and over the surface of the land. The movement of water through and over the surface of the land is affected by a variety of factors that need to be fully understood in order to prevent flooding, excessive soil erosion and the loss of groundwater recharge when there are changes in land use due to agriculture, deforestation, urbanization, or civil engineering projects.

3 credits


ENS 702 Groundwater Hydrology

Clean water is an essential resource for agriculture, domestic consumption and industrial use. Topics presented in this course include an examination of the factors affecting the movement and storage of groundwater within different types of aquifers, the transportation of contaminants within the groundwater, the chemical reactions that take place between these contaminants, the modeling of groundwater flow and contaminant flow and the remediation of contaminated groundwater.

3 credits


ENS 703 Limnology

Limnology is the study of the biological, chemical, physical and hydrologic aspects of inland bodies of water. These bodies of water include running water (streams and rivers) and standing water (lakes, ponds and wetlands) composed of either fresh or salt water. Inland bodies of water are dynamic systems that can be subjected to extreme environmental changes, such as the short term changes that accompany the change in seasons and longer term changes that accompany climatic changes. Changes in both urban and rural land use also have a profound impact on these systems by altering the quality of the water filling these inland bodies of water.

3 credits


ENS 704 Sedimentology

Sedimentary rocks form a thin veneer over the surface of the earth, so are the rocks that are most associated with human activity. Sedimentary rocks hold groundwater, hydrocarbons and mineral resources and help our understanding of the physical, chemical and climatic changes that took place over the past several hundred million years. Prerequisite: ENS 601, or the permission of the instructor.

3 credits


ENS 705 Geology of New York City area.

The geology of the greater New York City and Long Island areas is diverse in terms of rock type and geological processes. This area contains igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks that were subjected to multiple tectonic events, erosion and glaciation. This course will examine the complexities of the geology of these areas and provide a valuable understanding of the rocks and geologic processes to anyone working in the New York City area.


ENS 706 Meteorology

Meteorology is the study of the atmosphere and short term weather events. This course will examine the physical and chemical conditions within the atmosphere, such as heat flow, air pressure, moisture content and atmospheric circulation that control the weather and weather patterns. Weather analysis, weather forecasting and extreme weather events will also be covered in this course.

3 credits


ENS 707 Soils

This course will examine how soils form and are classified and will examine the physical, chemical and biological properties of soils and the detail the importance of soil management in agronomy and environmental management. The environmental problems associated with soil erosion and runoff will also be examined as well as ways to restore degraded soils so that they can once again support both agricultural and native plant life.

3 credits


ENS 711 Ecology

This course is designed to introduce students to the broad field of ecology. Ecology is the study of the abundance and distribution of all forms of life in their natural environment. Ecological studies are also concerned with the various interactions that occur between different populations and between the organisms and their environment. This course presents an overview of the various subdivisions of ecology such as community ecology and population ecology.

3 credits


ENS 712 Population Ecology

Population ecology is the subdivision of ecology that deals specifically with the dynamics of species populations and how they interact with the environment. Population structure, population growth, population regulation and population fluctuations are all examined in this course. Prerequisite: ENS 711, or the permission of the instructor.

3 credits


ENS 713 Community Ecology

Community ecology is the subdivision of ecology that studies the distribution, development, structure and interactions between coexisting populations in the natural environment. This course offers an in depth examination of these interactions. Prerequisite: ENS 711, or the permission of the instructor.

3 credits


ENS 714 Invasive Species Ecology

Invasive species are non-native species of plants, animals, fish and insects that are transported from one geographic location to another. Some of these species coexist with native species, but unfortunately some are very invasive and crowd out native species in the introduced area. This course will identify many invasive species and examine the economic and environmental problems associated with their introduction into non-native areas. This course will also examine how invasive species are introduced into non-native environments, what preventative measures can be used to stop their introduction into non-native environments and how to reduce the spread of invasive species in non-native environments.

3 credits


ENS 715 Wetlands and Estuarine Ecology

Estuarine ecology is the subdivision of ecology that studies the physical, chemical and biological aspects of the estuarine environment. Estuaries are complex environments due to the rapid changes in salinity levels, sediment load, oxygen levels and nutrient loads that they experience. Adding to the complexity of this environment is the fact that many urban centers are located on estuaries, which results in the release of high levels of both urban and industrial pollutants. This course examines both the natural and the anthropogenic complexities of the estuarine environment.

3 credits


ENS 721 Environmental Chemistry

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of environmental chemistry. Topics presented in this course include a description of the various types of domestic, industrial and agricultural chemicals that are released into the air, water and soil, the chemical reactions that take place once these chemicals are released and some of the environmental problems that are associated with the release of these chemicals.

3 credits


ENS 722 Environmental Toxicology

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of environmental toxicology and the environmental problems that are associated with the release of toxins into the environment. Topics presented in this course include a description of the various types of chemicals that are released into the environment, how these chemicals are absorbed by different organisms and the effects that these chemicals have on the various populations of organisms ingesting them.

3 credits


ENS 723 Biological Effects of Environmental Toxins

This course is designed to give students of environmental toxicology greater insight into the biological effects that environmental toxins have on organisms. Topics presented in this course include a description of the various types of toxins released into the environment (volatile organic compounds, metals, inorganic gases) and the biological effects that they have on organisms. Prerequisite: ENS 722, or the permission of the instructor.

3 credits


ENS 724 World Trade Center Health Issues

Toxins contained in the dust from the collapse of the World Trade Center in 2001 has produced a number of chronic health problems (mostly affecting the lungs) in the emergency workers and construction workers who labored at the site in the days, weeks and months following the terrorist attack. Historically, the health of workers in other fields have also been affected by the material that they were working with, most notably ship workers suffer from asbestosis, stone cutters suffer from silicosis and coal miners suffer from black lung. This course will examine the health problems affecting the rescue workers and construction workers working at the World Trade Center and also examine industries that are associated with lung disease.

3 credits


ENS 725 Transport Mechanisms of Pollutants

Some pollutants travel vast distances from their source to their eventual sink and often undergo chemical changes along the way. This course examines the basic chemical processes affecting chemical transport through the air, water and subsurface and examines the breakdown products of some common chemical pollutants. This course also introduces students to chemical transport modeling and risk assessment. Prerequisite: ENS 721, or the permission of the instructor.

3 credits


ENS 730 Tropical Agroforestry and Sustainable Tropical Forestry

Throughout the world, tropical forests are being burned down at an alarming rate to create plantations and farmland and are being destroyed as a result of overaggressive logging operations. The loss of these forests has resulted in the loss of the rich biodiversity within these forests, excessive soil erosion and, in some cases, the loss of the coral reefs in the shallow marine areas downstream from the deforested areas. This course will examine how agroforestry and sustainable tropical forestry management techniques can allow indigenous people to use their forests in ways that won’t destroy them.

3 credits


ENS 731 Sustainable Development

The study of sustainable development is the study of the resources that are needed by both present and future generations of people. Natural resources are required by all societies for food, energy and shelter. Some of these resources are finite, while others are renewable. This course will examine the economic, environmental and political aspects of supplying both industrialized countries and developing countries with the resources they need for this and future generations.

3 credits


ENS 732 Conventional Energy Resources

Oil, natural gas, coal and hydroelectric power are considered conventional energy resources. Currently, conventional energy resources supply the bulk of the World's energy needs. This course will examine the history, use and importance of these energy sources. This course will also examine the benefits and drawbacks of using each of these different types of energy sources from geologic, technical, economic, environmental, health and political points of view.

3 credits


ENS 733 Alternative Energy Resources

Oil, natural gas and coal supply the majority of the World's energy needs. They are also finite resources that will diminish in supply and increase in cost in the future. These resources also release large amounts of CO2, which have been linked to global warming. These problems have increased the need for alternative forms of energy, which include solar, wind, biofuels, nuclear, geothermal and tidal energy. This course will also examine the benefits and drawbacks of using each of these alternative types of energy resources from technical, economic, environmental, health and political points of view.

3 credits


ENS 734 Environmental Policy and Economics

Environmental issues of concern today include pollution, environmental degradation, energy use, endangered species, sustainable development and the extraction and use of natural resources. This class will examine these environmental issues from both economic and policy points of view. Environmental policies discussed in this class will include, but not be limited to, the Clean Water Act, Clean Air Act and the Endangered Species Act.

3 credits


ENS 735 Independent Study

Students wishing to study some aspect of environmental science that is not offered as a class can do so as an independent study class. The student or students taking independent study will meet monthly with the professor supervising the class. Students will be given both reading and written assignments on a monthly basis.

3 credits


ENS 736 Thesis Research

Students opting to engage in thesis research will take this class. The student or students working on a thesis will meet monthly with the professor supervising the thesis project.

1 - 3 credits